Health Tips

20 Foods That Are High in Vitamin E

20 Foods High in Vitamin E Vitamin E is a common nutrient found in most foods. A few foods, including cooking oils, seeds and nuts, are exceptionally rich sources. 1. Wheat Germ Oil — 135% DV per serving 1 tablespoon: 20 mg (135% DV) 100 grams: 149 mg (996% DV) 2. Sunflower Seeds — 66% DV per serving 1 ounce: 10 mg (66% DV) 100 grams: 35 mg (234% DV) 3. Almonds — 48% DV per serving 1 ounce: 7.3 mg (48% DV) 100 grams: 26 mg (171% DV) 4. Hazelnut Oil — 43% DV per serving 1 tablespoon: 6.4 mg (43% DV) 100 grams: 47 mg (315% DV) 5. Mamey Sapote — 39% DV per serving Half a fruit: 5.9 mg (39% DV) 100 grams: 2.1 mg (14% DV) 6. Sunflower Oil — 37% DV per serving 1 tablespoon: 5.6 mg (37% DV) 100 grams: 41 mg (274% DV) 7. Almond Oil — 36% DV per serving 1 tablespoon: 5.3 mg (36% DV) 100 grams: 39 mg (261% DV) 8. Hazelnuts — 28% DV per serving 1 ounce: 4.3 mg (28% DV) 100 grams: 15 mg (100%...

More Details...

Xanthan Gum — Is This Food Additive Healthy or Harmful?

What Is Xanthan Gum? Xanthan gum is a popular food additive that’s commonly added to foods as a thickener or stabilizer. It’s created when sugar is fermented by a type of bacteria called Xanthomonas campestris. When sugar is fermented, it creates a broth or goo-like substance, which is made solid by adding an alcohol. It is then dried and turned into a powder. When xanthan gum powder is added to a liquid, it quickly disperses and creates a viscous and stable solution. This makes it a great thickening, suspending and stabilizing agent for many products. It was discovered by scientists in 1963. Since then, it has been well researched and determined safe. Therefore, the FDA has approved it as a food additive and placed no limitations on the amount of xanthan gum a food can contain. Even though it’s made in a lab, it’s a soluble fiber. Soluble fibers are carbs that your body cannot breakdown. Instead, they absorb water and turn ...

More Details...

A High-Protein Diet Plan to Lose Weight and Improve Health

What Is Protein and Why Is It Important? Protein is one of the three macronutrients, along with carbs and fat. In your body, it performs the following roles: Repair and maintenance: Protein is the main component of your muscles, bones, skin and hair. These tissues are continuously repaired and replaced with new protein. Hormones: Chemical messenger proteins allow cells and organs in your body to communicate with each other. Enzymes: Most enzymes are proteins, and the thousands of chemical reactions that take place throughout your body are driven by them. Transportation and storage: Some proteins help deliver important molecules where they’re needed. For example, the protein hemoglobin carries oxygen to your body’s cells. Protein is made up of smaller units known as amino acids. Of the 22 amino acids, 9 are considered “essential,” meaning they must be consumed in food because your body can’t make them....

More Details...

14 Simple Ways to Stop Eating Lots of Sugar

1. Cut Back on Sugar-Filled Drinks Some popular drinks contain a heap of added sugar. Sodas, energy drinks, sports drinks and fruit drinks contribute an astounding 44% of the added sugar in the American diet. So-called “healthy” drinks, such as smoothies and fruit juices, can still contain eye-watering amounts of it. For example, 15.2 ounces (450 ml) of 100% apple juice contains more than 12 teaspoons (49 grams). Your body does not recognize calories from drinks in the same way it does from food. Drinks don’t make you feel as full, so people who consume lots of calories from drinks do not eat less to compensate. Studies have consistently shown that reducing your intake of sugary drinks can help with weight loss. Here are some better, lower-sugar drink options: Water: It’s free and has zero calories. Sparkling water with a squeeze of fresh lemon or lime: Homemade soda. Water with mint and cucumber: Amazingly refreshin...

More Details...

9 Impressive Health Benefits of Beets

1. Many Nutrients in Few Calories Beets boast an impressive nutritional profile. They are low in calories yet high in valuable vitamins and minerals. In fact, they contain a bit of almost all the vitamins and minerals that you need. Here is an overview of the nutrients found in a 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of cooked beetroot: Calories: 44 Protein: 1.7 grams Fat: 0.2 grams Fiber: 2 grams Vitamin C: 6% of the RDI Folate: 20% of the RDI Vitamin B6: 3% of the RDI Magnesium: 6% of the RDI Potassium: 9% of the RDI Phosphorous: 4% of the RDI Manganese: 16% of the RDI Iron: 4% of the RDI Beets also contain inorganic nitrates and pigments, both of which are plant compounds that have a number of health benefits. 2. Help Keep Blood Pressure in Check Heart disease, including heart attacks, heart failure and stroke, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. And high bloo...

More Details...

14 Natural Ways to Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

1. Get More Sleep A good night's sleep is important for your health. In contrast, a lack of sleep can be harmful and increase your risk of infections, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Several studies have also linked poor sleep to reduced insulin sensitivity. For example, one study in nine healthy volunteers found that getting just four hours of sleep in one night reduced insulin sensitivity and the ability to regulate blood sugar, compared to getting eight and a half hours of sleep. Fortunately, catching up on lost sleep can reverse the effects of poor sleep on insulin resistance. 2. Exercise More Regular exercise is one of the best ways to increase insulin sensitivity. It helps move sugar into the muscles for storage and promotes an immediate increase in insulin sensitivity, which lasts 2–48 hours, depending on the exercise. For example, one study found that 60 minutes of cycling on a machine at a moderate pace increased insulin s...

More Details...

Is Pink Himalayan Salt Better Than Regular Salt?

What Is Salt? Salt is a mineral largely consisting of the compound sodium chloride. Salt contains so much sodium chloride — around 98% by weight — that most people use the words “salt” and “sodium” interchangeably. Salt can be produced by evaporating salt water or extracting solid salt from underground salt mines. Before it reaches your grocery store, table salt also goes through a refining process to remove impurities and any other minerals besides sodium chloride. Anticaking agents are sometimes added to help absorb moisture, and iodine is often included to help consumers prevent iodine deficiency. Humans have used salt to flavor and preserve foods for thousands of years. Interestingly, sodium also plays an important role in several biological functions, including fluid balance, nerve conduction and muscle contraction. For this reason, it’s absolutely necessary to have salt, or sodium, in your diet. However, ma...

More Details...

Potatoes: Healthy or Unhealthy?

What Are Potatoes? Potatoes are a type of edible plant tuber eaten around the world. Scientifically known as Solanum tuberosum, they belong to the nightshade family of plants. Originating in the South American Andes, potatoes are now cultivated in 160 countries worldwide, with 1,500–2,000 different species that range in color, size and nutrient content. Nevertheless, many varieties are similar in composition, consisting of a starchy flesh covered by a thin, nutrient-rich skin. Potatoes can be boiled, steamed, fried, baked or roasted and used in a wide assortment of dishes. Potatoes Are High in Many Nutrients There are many types of potatoes that include an array of different nutrient sets. One medium (6.1 ounces or 173 grams) Russet baked potato, including the flesh and skin, provides the following: Calories: 168 Fat: 0 grams Protein: 5 grams Carbs: 37 grams Fiber: 4 grams Sodium: 24 milligrams Vita...

More Details...

Do Nutrient Deficiencies Cause Cravings?

Cravings are defined as intense, urgent or abnormal desires or longings. Not only are they very common, but they’re also arguably one of the most intense feelings you can experience when it comes to food. Some believe that cravings are caused by nutrient deficiencies and view them as the body’s way to correct them. Yet others insist that, unlike hunger, cravings are largely about what your brain wants, rather than what your body actually needs. This article explores whether specific nutrient deficiencies cause food cravings. Proposed Link Between Nutrient Deficiencies and Cravings A growing number of people believe that food cravings are the body’s subconscious way of filling a nutritional need. They assume that when the body lacks a specific nutrient, it naturally craves foods that are rich in that nutrient. For instance, chocolate cravings are often blamed on low magnesium levels, whereas cravings for meat or cheese are often seen a...

More Details...

7 Health Benefits of Eating Cucumber

1. It’s High in Nutrients Cucumbers are low in calories but high in many important vitamins and minerals. One 11-ounce (300-gram) unpeeled, raw cucumber contains the following: Calories: 45 Total fat: 0 grams Carbs: 11 grams Protein: 2 grams Fiber: 2 grams Vitamin C: 14% of the RDI Vitamin K: 62% of the RDI Magnesium: 10% of the RDI Potassium: 13% of the RDI Manganese: 12% of the RDI Although, the typical serving size is about one-third of a cucumber, so eating a standard portion would provide about one-third of the nutrients above. Additionally, cucumbers have a high water content. In fact, cucumbers are made up of about 96% water. To maximize their nutrient content, cucumbers should be eaten unpeeled. Peeling them reduces the amount of fiber, as well as certain vitamins and minerals, in a serving. 2. It Contains Antioxidants Antioxidants are molecules that block oxidation, ...

More Details...

Showing 30 out of 110 entries